Archive for May, 2016

Tree of the month: June 2016

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

Dan Crowley, Westonbirt's dendrologist
What is tree of the month?
Aesculus indica (Indian horse chestnut)

Indian chestnut - whole tree
Why is it tree of the month?
The Indian horse chestnut is notable for both its bronze new foliage (see the whole tree photo!) and flowers in panicles that provide an arboreal highlight as we move in to the summer months. The leaves turn a glossy green and the showy flowers usually appear in June to July and look as though they won’t too far away this year! In maturity the bark peels in long strips.

Indian horse chestnut - leaves and flower headsIndian horse chestnut - bark
The species is native of the north west Himalaya and was introduced in 1851. It is seen far less frequently in the UK than its European relative, Aesculus hippocastanum, and its later flowering time than this species is an added attraction.

Where can I find it?
Our largest example can be found on Loop Walk in the Old Arboretum and an equally interesting example of multi-stemmed habit is found close to the relatively new path which links Mitchell Drive and Main Drive in the Old Arboretum.

Dan Crowley, Dendrologist

Still plenty of work to be done!

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

The opening ceremony for Phase Two may have now been and gone, but there is still plenty of ongoing work for the Westonbirt Project.

Those of you who are regular followers of the blog will remember that Phase One has numerous ongoing activities supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Aside from the community work, Downs restoration and various site-wide interpretation, the HLF are also supporting a large amount of boundary restoration.

Existing wall around the Downs awaiting restoration.

The next boundary that we are restoring is the dry stone Ha-Ha wall with iron railings that runs around the Downs. Ha-Ha walls are put in place to provide an uninterrupted view whilst creating a vertical barrier often to help contain livestock as this particular wall was originally. The name “Ha-Ha” derives from the unexpected (i.e., amusing) moment of discovery when, on approach, the vertical drop suddenly becomes visible. Fortunately, due to the iron railings attached to the Downs Ha-Ha, the drop is not quite as hidden!

The restoration process has now begun with the removal of the iron railings, and these will all be restored while our dry stone waller takes the lead and takes the wall down stone by stone, before building it back up to its former glory. The iron railings will then be reinstalled using an onsite forge.

Volunteers helping with the restoration of the ha-ha near Mitchell Drive.

The dry stone waller will be aided throughout by a number of our volunteers, who will be able to learn this specialised skill. At approx. 625 metres they will have plenty of practice, and the restoration process is expected to take around four months.

As the wall runs so close to the Dew pond which inhabits Great Crested Newts, and newts love dry stone walls, e.g. for hibernation, plans have been put into place to keep them from harm, and a newt license has been granted by Natural England for the works. We aim to coincide the works closest to the pond with the time at which the newts are most likely to be in the water.

Finished wall and railings along Mitchell Drive.

For those of you visiting the site soon, you will be able to see this all unfolding, and if you look along Mitchell Drive, you will see a boundary of the same style which we previously restored in 2012.

Dan Reid, Project Support Officer