Posts Tagged ‘fences’

Wooden Wonders part 12: Atlas cedar, by Kate Cashmore

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Westonbirt, The National Arboretum, is full of magnificent trees.

As part of our half term Wooden Wonders event taking place from 14 – 16 February, Kate Cashmore from Westonbirt’s learning team has created a trail which will help you find out about our hidden wonders.

Here, she highlights some of the Wooden Wonders that you can discover when you follow the trail.

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This close relation of the grand Cedar of Lebanon comes from the Atlas mountains of Northern Africa.

It is now being grown as a timber tree in the South of France because it is more tolerant of hot and dry conditions than most conifers. This could make it a useful tree to cope with climate change in Britain.        

The heartwood is strongly scented and resinous. It is durable, and the knotty wood that grows in Britain is mainly used for outdoor furniture, gates and fences.

Useful links
Find out more about the Wooden Wonders event
Buy great value Friends of Westonbirt Arboretum membership
More great activities for families

Wooden Wonders part nine: larch, by Kate Cashmore

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Westonbirt, The National Arboretum, is full of magnificent trees.

As part of our half term Wooden Wonders event taking place from 14 – 16 February, Kate Cashmore from Westonbirt’s learning team has created a trail which will help you find out about our hidden wonders.

Here, she highlights some of the Wooden Wonders that you can discover when you follow the trail.

Although Westonbirt’s larch trees shed their leaves last autumn, they are conifers and have soft wood.  They mature in 60 to 70 years.

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The wood needs seasoning or drying before using, as it tends to bend as it dries. Timber is seasoned either outdoors or in a kiln.

Outdoors, it is carefully stacked so that air can circulate and the moisture evaporates over a period of weeks or months.

In a kiln warm air and steam is circulated by fans until the desired moisture content is achieved.     

Once dry, its straightness, strength and moderate durability makes it a useful timber for outdoor use, in fences, poles, and wagons.

Useful links
Find out more about the Wooden Wonders event
Buy great value Friends of Westonbirt Arboretum membership
More great activities for families